Keep Your Jewelry Safe From Bleach

Published: 22nd November 2011
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Avoid expensive repairs or complete destruction of the gold jewelry by keeping it from chlorine containing compounds whenever possible. This damage is the result of a phenomenon called stress corrosion cracking. Stress brought on by manufacturing or repair operations, in conjunction with the existence of chlorine, causes cracks to show up in gold jewelry. Hammering, stretching, bending, stone setting and daily wear all cause stress in jewelry.

In a recent jewelry trade show we saw a demonstration from the destructive effects of the chemical. A gold music band was put into a container of undiluted bleach. Pressure was applied having a device much like a little C-clamp. Within 5 minutes the ring had cracked into pieces.

Another example occurred a couple of years ago. A female created a ring which she had soaked in Clorox for over day. The ring crumbled within our fingers.

Most damage will not occur only at that rapid rate. It is because of repeated contact with weaker concentrations of chlorine over the long time period. Maintain your jewelry from pools, hot tubs, or diluted bleach utilized for cleaning. Even some moving water supplies contain enough chlorine to cause problems.

How it changes your jewelry due to this exposure? Prongs fall off and stones are lost. Jewelry cracks into a number of pieces. Thin sections may collapse.

Other chemicals may also cause stress corrosion, for example acetic acid-salt solutions. A typical example of this is actually the vinegar and salt solution utilized to make pickles.

The larger the karat the gold may be the less effected it really is by stress corrosion. Jewelry produced from 18 karat gold or platinum mostly avoids these problems.


Avoid expensive repairs or complete destruction of the gold jewelry by keeping it from chlorine containing compounds whenever possible. This damage is the result of a phenomenon called stress corrosion cracking. Stress brought on by manufacturing or repair operations, in conjunction with the existence of chlorine, causes cracks to show up in gold jewelry. Hammering, stretching, bending, stone setting and daily wear all cause stress in jewelry.

In a dramatic experiment we witnessed a demonstration from the destructive effects of the chemical. A gold ring was put into a container of undiluted bleach. Pressure was applied with a device much like a little C-clamp. Within 5 minutes the ring had cracked into pieces.

Another example occurred a couple of years ago. A customer showed us a ring which she had soaked in bleach for over day. The ring crumbled within our fingers.

Most damage will not occur only at that rapid rate. It is because of repeated contact with weaker concentrations of chlorine over the long time period. Be sure to remove your jewelry when you are in pools, hot tubs, or using diluted bleach utilized for cleaning. Even some household city water supplies contain enough chlorine to cause problems.

What is the effect of this exposure? Prongs fall off and stones are lost. Jewelry cracks into a number of pieces. Thin sections may collapse.

Other chemicals may also cause stress corrosion, for example acetic acid-salt solutions. A typical example of this is actually the vinegar and salt solution utilized to make pickles.

The larger the karat the gold may be the less effected it really is by stress corrosion. Jewelry produced from 18 karat gold or platinum mostly avoids these problems.

Avoid expensive repairs or complete destruction of your gold jewelry by keeping it away from chlorine containing compounds as much as possible. Stress corrosion cracking is the name given to this phenomena. Stretching, bending, stone setting, hammering, and daily wear all cause stress in jewelry. The stress problem is magnified by the presence of chlorine and can causes cracks to appear in gold jewelry.

A dramatic example occurred a few years ago. A woman brought in a ring which she had soaked in Clorox for over 24 hours, wanting to see for herself the effects of this chemical. The ring was pulverised into crumbles.

A demonstration of the destructive effects of this chemical was given at a professional trade show. A gold wedding band was placed in a container of undiluted Clorox. Pressure was applied with small clamp. Within 5 minutes the ring had cracked into pieces.


Most damage does not occur at this rapid rate. It is a result of repeated exposure to weaker concentrations of chlorine over a long period of time. Keep your jewelry out of swimming pools, hot tubs, or diluted bleach used for cleaning. Even some drinking water supplies contain enough chlorine to cause problems.

The higher the karat the gold is the less effected it is by stress corrosion. Jewelry made from 18 karat gold or platinum mostly avoids these problems.

Other chemicals can also cause stress corrosion, such as acetic acid-salt solutions such as the vinegar and salt solution used to make homemade pickles.

FInd out more valuable information about Gold Jewelry at
J&J Jewelers
6160 SW S.R. 200, Suite 104, Ocala, Florida, 34476
Jewelry Ocala FL

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